Exploring the Church of the Knights Templar

Always shrouded in a cloud of mystery, the Church of The Knight Templar in London is well worth a visit.

Built in the late 12th-century and built by the Knights Templar during the reign of King John in 1199 to 1216, the church served as a royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templar.

With strange symbols carved into statues, columns and walls and intriguing medieval spaces of worship, whilst wandering through the halls of the church, it’s easy to fall in love with the mysteries surrounding that of The Knights Templar. Even the stone faces on the effigy’s of the knights is captivating enough to have you staring for more than a few minutes. With many of their faces smiling up at you from the cold stone floor. Expressions of men, who passed this earth knowing secrets we will never truly understand, and many never know.

I regularly spend time exploring strange places wherever I travel, and seek a particular interest in discovering specific travel locations, which are not normally referenced in a traditional travel brochure. I do this for a variety of reasons.

Often these places are quiet with hardly any people about; mostly as they are not part of most travel itineraries. This gives you the opportunity to really enjoy the space, take the photos you dream about, where no person is about and spending a few moments of solace in the space, to properly learn and explore a location.

There is so much we still don’t know about our past. Even through the use of written word, not all accounts have been recorded, and part of me actually prefers it this way; not knowing the answers to all. As I feel it is the mystery which makes these unique locations well worth the visit. And with all the enigma surrounding the knights, how could you not go and spent some time reflecting on an era, where the Knight Templar were once looked upon in awe and recognised as one of the most holiest orders to ever been created; and destroyed by mankind.

And all of this history is tucked away, in a rather insignificant looking building from the outside, alongside the River Thames of London.



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