the best Autumn leaves in Sydney
Travel Tips

Sydney’s Best Places to See Autumn Leaves

Quick – There’s still time to catch the beautiful Autumn leaves for the season, before they all blow away for Winter.

It’s okay that we are already into the 4th day of winter. There are still loads of places around Sydney, where you can see the colourful autumn leaves.

Thanks to our sunny Autumn days, and sunny Winter days as well, our Autumn leaves tend to stick around at least a few days or so after the season has finished.

I don’t normally blog on a Friday, but for anyone looking to check out some beautiful golden, red and orange autumn leaves around Sydney before Winter sets in and they all turn brown and disappear, I wanted to share some places I managed to visit (and some I didn’t get to) where the leaves are still beautiful.

Though I wouldn’t leave it too long before you make a trip to check out one of these fabulous places to see the leaves, as the weather man has predicted a few scattered days here and there where there will be rain and there will be wind. Normally when those types of wintery days kick in, the leaves do quickly turn brown and fall.

I have serious Autumn tree envy with our neighbour, who has a spectacular boutique version of a maple tree, so probably about 10 foot tall and around 6 feet wide, or thereabouts. When the Autumn season kicks in, the tree turns beautiful shades of yellow, gold, orange, red and even some shades I wouldn’t even know how to describe. It quite literally turns into the flames of a fire – just incredible.

After a very rainy day in Sydney yesterday and a lot of wind today, the tree has almost turned all brown, with many of its leaves now fallen to the ground. Proof that it really doesn’t take too long for Autumn leaves to disappear once Winter arrives.

Check out these best places around Sydney (including greater parts of Sydney as well) where you can still see the beautiful Autumn leaves.

the best Autumn leaves in Sydney

Royal Botanical Gardens: Free entry and located in the heart of the city, many trees are still glowing the colours of reds, oranges and yellows, which is pretty spectacular.

Centennial Park: This park can be hit or miss when it comes to finding Autumn leaves. Lucky you can drive around most of the park to hunt them down. however, most of the trees along the waters edge of the rive/pond are still looking beautiful.

Auburn Botanical Gardens: Here you will find throughout the gardens, a unique and smallish tree called the Japanese Maple. These trees generally turn all completely yellow and are completely stunning. Definitely with the drive out to the gardens to see the maple trees.

Rumsey Rose Garden: Located in Parramatta Park, which also has loads of other nice areas where the trees are colours in beautiful Autumn leaves, the rose garden is pretty spectacular to see, with many of the trees still coated in colour leaves.

Macarthur Park – Camden: If you are happy to drive around 45 minutes south of Sydney, then Camden is a great place to go check out the beautiful coloured leaves of Autumn. Macarthur Park has a small walkway through the park which is lined with pretty autumn leaves. Perfect for that instagram shot.

Bowral – Southern Highlands: Known for some of the most scenic Autumn sites, though Bowral isn’t really considered part of Sydney, it’s worth mentioning, as the leaves around the area of Bowral, are absolutely incredible to see. With many roads, covered in yellow leaves and trees flames with red leaves.

Blue Mountains Botanic Gardens: I always find the leaves here last the longest for Autumn and into at least a few weeks into Winter. Not sure if that’s because it’s sits a lot higher that Sydney, and received more sunlight. But the gardens here are incredible and the leaves are worth the drive. I recommend going on a Sunday morning though, early ahead of traffic to head up the mountains, as the traffic can get fairly intense on a weekend.

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